(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Sweets for leisure hours, or, Flowers of instruction"

LEISURE HOURS; 

OR 

FLOWERS OF INSTRUCTION. 




wffgm 



I'll watch thy dawn ofjoys, and mould 
Thy little heart to duty; 
I'll teach thee words as 1 behold 
Thy faculties, like flowers, unfbld 

In iatellectual beauty. 

NEW HAVEN. 

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED 
BY S. BABCOCK. 



i£#g 



ig 



mu 



5^ 




fo]!oI!oI!oi^][o]!o]!ol^[o]^l[oI[o]^][ol(£l^Iil 



FOR 

LEISURE HOURS; 

OR 

FLOWERS OF INSTRUCTION. 



.HtlMlI'lltlW 




I'll watch tliy dawn of joys, and mould 

Thy little heart to duty; 

I'll teach thee words as I behold 

Thy (acuities hke flowers unfold 

In intellectual beauty. 



NEW HAVEN. 

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED 
BY S. BABCOCK. 



{^[QlfolfoT^fo](o]roi fo1lQl fo1fo]to1f0l td1[oll0l !gl 



1 



GOOD LITTLE FRED 













IWIHIE!^ 



FOR LEISURE HOURS. 



GOOD LITTLE FRED. 

When little Fred 

Was calPd to bed, 
He always acted right; 

He kiss'd Papa, 

And then Mamma, 
And wish'd them both good night. 



He made no noise, 

Like naughty boys ; 
But quietly up stairs, 

Directly went, 

As soon as sent, 
And always said his prayers. 



X 



THE DUNCE. 



X 
X 



X 



X 




3£ 



H* 



oQo. 



SWEETS FOR LEISURE HOURS. & 

THE DUNCE. 

3g Pray, what do all these pictures mean ? 
■iF They must have some design, 
IP For words in every page are seen, — 
P Each picture has a line? 

E And do you really wish to know 

fc What these same lines explain? II 

t Or do you ask me but to show dp 

J£ You feel no sense of shame ? X 

p How can a girl of Emma's years, £|£ 

Ask, without blushing cheeks, 35 

What ought to fill her eyes with tears, £j£ 

So plain the dunce it speaks. 3£ 

2^ Ah! had she, like another girl, s£ 

h But learned in time to read, s£ 

P She now would know these subjects gg 
F well, | 

F Nor my assistance need. S> 

p z 



$6 

is 
i 

z 



PENNY WISE. 







X SWEETS FOK LEISURE HOURS. 7 !" 

X 

X w 

■$° PENNY WISE 

X 

^t Grand-mamma gave Jane a penny, 

2£ Because she said her lesson well ; ° 

K And Jane saw pretty things, so many, °<£ 

c^jo Which was best, she scarce could 3jS 

ofto tell. oflo 

£fc At the toy-shop she stood gazing, 
X Still she could not make a choice; 
^ To a doll her eye was raising, 
3£ When she heard a feeble voice 

x 

3£ Wish her every good and blessing, 
jjg If a farthing she would spare; 
£j£ The beggar said his wants were pres- 
et sing, 
X And pointed to his silver hair. 

I 

3^ Jane heard, and freely gave her penny; [¥ 
4° A tear was in the old man's eye ; 3g 
X Jane bought no doll, nor had she any <=fc 
ofe Wish, a single toy to buy. M 



$ 



Z 



&8 



L5JL 

THE SICK CHILD 




clfr SWEETS FOR LEISURE HOURS. ! 

z 

THE SICK CHILD. 

" Mamma, my head," 

Poor William said, 
°()° " So very badly aches, 

Tell sister, there, «**> 

orto I cannot bear Sfe 
£fc The tiresome noise she makes." ^fe 

X " I'm sure," said Jane, |fc 

3^ If I had known, 3g 

^ You were so very ill, 3£ 

I would have read, 3Jo 

Or drawn instead, 3f 

3K And have remained quite still." o£ 

oflo c#a 

3£ Then mamma smil'd 3» 

Upon her child ; 
X (Well pleas'd was the kind mother,) j£ 

^ " I am, my dear, 3jo 
2£ Rejoic'd to hear 

j# Your answer to your brother. <>£> 

Children," said she, o^o 

$£ ! always be JS 

db Thus kind to one another." sfe 

cyio opt) 



10 HAPPY LITTLE CHARLOTTE. 




SWEETS FOR LEISURE HOURS. 



11$ 

X 



HAPPY LITTLE CHARLOTTE. ^g 

± 

How happy little Charlotte looks, 060 

Playing with her toys ; %E 

Her doll how neat, how clean her dfe 

books ; 2E 

She keeps them — not destroys ^ 

~£ To see a book with corners turned, g£ 
^p Denotes a child a dunce ; 
3g Charlotte has this maxim learned, 
Hr Although she did so once 






gb And then she said, "'tis wrong, I q~ 
3£ know ; 3jo 

°o° I will not do it again ;" 4° 

c& And when she said she would not do, 5£ 
oE The promise was not vain. 4o 

^ I^will — you never heard her say, 
3)o But when such words were right ; 3£ 
$ For this they bought that doll so gay, $ 
d£> She holds with such delight. 3£ 

& sE 



SLSLSLSL. 

ins — 

THE CANARY 




:TTKlT6irfr$Q^>S = T5 = l)iri51l 



HfH4H£4£H£HH 



SWEETS FOR LEISURE HOURS. 



13 S 



THE CANARY. 

! Mary had a little bird, 

With feathers bright and yellow, 
; Slender legs, — upon my word, 

He was a pretty fellow. 

; Sweetest notes he always sung, 
Which much delighted Mary ; 
,' Often where his cage was hung, 
She sat to hear Canary. 

; Crumbs of bread, and dainty seeds, 
She carried to him daily ; 

; Seeking for the early weeds, 
She deck'd his palace gaily. 

JE This, my little readers, learn, 
°fa And ever practice duly ; 
5!o Songs and smiles of love return 
3£ To friends who love you truly. 



1 * 88818888 888 i 38ili»8SS 2 88 8 8 mB 



$14 



THE VISIT AND INVITATION. 



oflo 






$ 




$ 
$ 
X 



X 

X 

X 
X 



Z1TZ oo TTTTTtf To u 



X 



SWEETS FOR LEISURE HOURS. 



+ THE VISIT AND INVITATION. ^g 

^t Maria so attentive grew, jjjpj 

^£ So civil and polite, ^jg 

2£ That all admired, and loved her too, ^j© 

cf> For all she did was right. <jg 

! Her good mamma entrusted her Sfe 

I A visit once to pay, ~fc 

; And thus she said, "Good morning, sir, 9g 

I hope you are well to-day ; ^° 

Mamma has sent me to entreat, 

That if the day be fine, 
You'll let dear Clara come and meet 

One or two friends of mine. 

Pray let her come, at all events, 
£j£ We've playthings to amuse ; 
<^° Mamma presents her compliments, 
°fl° And hopes you'll not refuse." 

ca= Miss Clara's mother then appeared, 
As she was going away ; 



$ 16 THE GOOD SCHOLAR. 3£ 

She soon the invitation heard, 
; And pressed her much to stay. ^ 

; u ± 

! " I'm wanted, yes, indeed I am, 
! I know, (said she,) at home ; ^L 

! Good morning, sir ; good morning ^fc 
; ma'am ; 

; But pray let Clara come." 



A* THE GOOD SCHOLAR. 

i 

^h Joseph West had been told, 

That if, when he grew old, 
«#> He had not learnt rightly to spell, 
cjo Though his writing were good, 

?{£ 'T would not be understood ; 

*b And he said, " I will learn my tasks 
Z well." 

jj£ And he made it a rule, 

^£ To be silent at school, 

^0° And what do you think came to pass ? 3 

c&> Why, he learned it so fast, 

cj>o That, from being the last, 

^ He soon was the first in his class. 



finnnnnryjn 



in 

fcfcl 






EBy 


W<Bmi 


P' 


■ 


WMjtLt^* 


MIK? 




KMs^m 


iH 






^^^Ppi^Uj 




^^^^^gkiL T $ ^ =" ^*i*ii 


It In 
lift 111 


BBNi* 


fjlHH 


- K ^Ij^lm _ , 


■^HC^^B^S 





H3iiIS0®0IE^S 



mm 

MORAL, INSTRUCTIVE, AND EN- fiStlS 
TERTAINING j§P 



toy books, mm 

0m 

usasnaiSiSgiiiJES) 

WITH • ^§$3 

SUPERIOR 

ENGRAVINGS, gg£| 

FOR at*§x 



EEAUTIFOLLV 



J| THE MIND AND THE EYE. 

DIFFERENT SIZES, *MWB 



WM'W 1EWK^H©'MS, 



If 



»® 



OF ALL THE 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

i